18 November 2014

Napoleonic Peacocks, Popinjays and Dandies (part 2)

So yesterday saw me continue working on the vignette, but before I show the next figure I thought it might be a good idea to show the image that inspired the first figure in the vignette.

As you will see I had to use a little artistic license on my own rendition mainly due to the trousers, but overall I think I have managed to capture the essence of the period and uniform.

Today is the turn of possible the most dandy of all the figures that I have chosen to work on, coming again from another knotel print in my collection, this time it is inspired by an ADC of Marshall Murat.

Sadly my camera is not catching the colour of the uniform quite right here, but the plate also informs us the uniform is Amaranth, a personal favourite colour of the Murat's. Amaranth is neither red nor purple or pink and described as a reddish purple hue or anything in between. Fortunately I have been messing around with my vallejo paints and got a triad I like to use to represent this colour, having had some google fu the best examples of the variety of colours that can be represented are found HERE.




As you can see I have opted for an Amaranth colour that encompasses the darker side of the choices, but set against the white and gold this works quite nicely.
He will certainly cut a dash in the finished Vignette, my intention is to try to make each ADC unique so they stand out as individuals as well as work together in the display.

Loki

40 comments:

  1. Hm, these guys are going to look like a tin of Quality Sweets!

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  2. Absolutly beautiful, these colors are stunning!

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  3. Oh my good Lord, what a uniform and beautifully painted by your good self.

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  4. Loki - love this colour! What beautiful work!!!

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  5. [sorry, off topic message] Just emailed Warbases with an order to pick up at the Stockton show, and mentioned to them that it was through your blog that I was made aware of their services. Just giving you some credit, where credit's due.

    Lovely painting, btw.

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  6. Gorgeous palette you've chosen Andrew. I hope you're feeling better these days.

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    1. I rather enjoyed this one Anne, I am getting better, not fully there yet but well on the way now.

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  7. He is rather splendid, going to be a riot of colour when finished

    Ian

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    1. hopefully the adjutants will calm it all down a touch

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  8. Very colourful. With these uniforms, they certainly put the camp into the army :)

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    1. Yes we can blame the peers trying to out do each other for these

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  9. Napoleonic's is not my thing (since I'm a lazy git), due to the amount of colouring and laces, and uniforms, and hats, and....but, when I look something like this, I'm feeling quite astonished. It's impressive to say the least Andrew, pretty much impressive! :)

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    1. Very kind of you to say so Thanos Thank you

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  10. Very nice work! Fabulously colourful uniform. Definately beats all the dreary functional uniforms of the last 100 years.

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  11. Lovely work there Andrew and a wonderfully colourful uniform

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  12. Very good looking miniature. Since it's a "colorful" period, bring on the color.

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  13. Terrific color choices! I really like the combination of white and fuschia.

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    1. Its certainly one to get you noticed which is the origin of these uniforms

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  14. Stunning brushwork and color mix! I adore this one and can't wait to see the finished vignette.

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    1. Thanks Monty its coming along although I will have a subdued entry soon

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  15. Very fetching. I think the bright colours and decorated uniforms must have been a reflection on the snobbery of the lords of the times trying to out fashion each other on the field. No wonder revolutions happened. Must have been expensive to equip armys like that.

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    1. In part this is very true, originally it was so they could be easily spotted in the smoke of battle, however the competition got so bad that Napoleon issued an order in 1811 to restrict his commanders from doing this it failed to stop it completely

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  16. I meant to ask - what are popinjays?

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    1. A vain, gaudy person; someone who is shallow or superficial. [from 16th c.]
      (archery) A target to be shot at, typically stuffed with feathers or plumage. [from 16th c.]

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  17. I agree ... the colours here are simply Amazing!

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  18. Lovely brushwork Andrew! Very nice choice of colours!

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  19. Those really look nice. Great job.

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