15 May 2014

An enjoyable creative aspect of the hobby - Pavement, Footpath, Flagstones or Sidewalks tutorial

One of the things I really enjoy is having a bit of free reign when painting and being given an opportunity to get creative. I was given another such occasion with an ongoing commission I am working on for Brigantes Studio. One of our clients has requested some rather nice prohibition era miniatures receive my treatment with the brush, but during our conversation regarding the bases he informed me that he had not thought about this, so I offered to sculpt some for the figures. We agreed on a flagstone path effect.

Now of course you can go out and purchase these things off the Internet and part with a fair amount of money for 5 or so bases, however this type of base requires a lot of model preparation removing the base inserting pins into the legs and then drilling the resin bases. This type of effect can easily be achieved with a couple of hours work at a fraction of the cost and I am going to show how I create such bases and how they paint up.



 The tools and items needed for this task. A damp cloth, small pot of water, milliput, sculpting tool, scalpel and an old paint brush.


I have cut several sections of milliput which you mix in equal parts as I have a lot of sculpting to do at the moment. However I only mix small amounts as I need them. Wipe your hands well after mixing on the damp cloth so you dont start getting putty all over your figures.


Start by placing a bit of the mixed putty and spreading it across the base, using a small bit of water on the blade of the sculpting tool to stop it sticking to it.


Work all the way around the figures base wetting and smoothing the surface as you go it does not have to be perfect as some flaws add to the character.




As you can see even being careful I have managed to get some on the figure, to sort this load up the old brush with some water an clean the affected area.


As you can see while the milliput has not cured you can correct small errors simply with some water.




Start with a couple of score lines from one edge of the base towards the bottom of the figure then rotate the base and score the opposite side to match.


Next score two more lines in the opposite direction to those done previously and you now have a flagstone effect. leave the milliput too harden for a couple of hours an you can then start to paint it up.


Start with a good base coat of black paint, making sure you get right into the score lines.


Next define each section in this case I have used vallejo cold grey, ensuring you leave the scored lines and any bits you could not score  that follow those lines in the base black.


Wash the cold grey once dried with nuln oil or equivalent and leave to dry this serves to define the rougher parts and creates good texture.


Finally dry brush some cold grey over the top again and you are done, of course you can add further lighter layers on top of this for more definition, but that is the basics of sculpting and painting this type of base covered I hope it proves useful to some of you out there.





27 comments:

  1. This is a timely tutorial for me as I'm now into painting my urban figures and need to make these types of bases. As you know my cobblestone skills are wretched. Are you going to do a tutorial on doing sidewalks? I've a series of figures that need sidewalks and paved roads and am not sure how to approach them.

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    1. You would adjust the score lines to suit the sixze of paver Anne, unless you are referring to cobbles that unfortunately at present I cant share due to a commercial conflict of interests

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  2. Great post. I like using milliput, but does not like me.. I am now getting an allergic reaction when I mix it and handle . Makes by skin turn red and tingly... Ouch... But I found I can still use it fine using those surgical latex gloves. Just thought peeps might want to know.

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    1. Good point Dave I have iron fingers so no problem but would recommend gloves

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  3. Excellent post, thanks for sharing :-)

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  4. Good post. Used Milliput for years with (thankfully no allergic reaction) and it's good to see it being promoted.
    One solution for cobbles (depending on scale) is split lentils/peas etc. They look very good once done, but they're obviously not for resurfacing the M1.

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  5. Damn well explained and shown old boy, very informative.

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  6. Nice tutorial Andrew. I might have to remember this if I get gangsters with plain bases.

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    1. I thought that's what you were doing already ;-)

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    2. Nope - the Blue Moon figures come with bases already done as paving stones, cobbles, asphalt or wooden floors so I haven't had to do this yet.

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  7. I like the scoring and seeing how you put it together.

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  8. Thanks for the tutorial! Now I've got to buy some milliput.

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  9. Very good. I have also used DAS modelling clay in a similar fashion. It's a tad easier as its ready to go straight from the pack - no mixing. Only thing once you open the pack, keep it in a sealed bag in fridge to stop the whole pack going off.

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  10. Very good tutorial !

    Best regards Michael

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  11. Great tutorial, might use this for some fantasy figures in the future.
    Cheers, Ross

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  12. Looks good to me and thanks there Loki.

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  13. Now that's why I like coming here, always something new and useful to read.

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  14. Great tutorial, very well thought out and explained.

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  15. Thanks Andrew, that will be very useful!

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  16. Nice tutorial. Thanks for sharing.

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  17. Both you and Tamsyn doing 1920s figures I wonder if this will become a trend. Maybe I should get some. Nice Tutorial mate.

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  18. Interesting tutorial. Thanks for sharing it, Andrew.

    Cheers
    Stefan

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