25 February 2014

Sometimes it take an age for things to sink in!!!

So I have been painting for well over half my life and seen a lot of fads come and go in my time.

Now I have never been much of a follower of fashion in my life in fact the only time was back in the very late 70's early 80's but that was more anti fashion in reality in my heady days of youth as a Gothic punk.

I have seen and used oil based paints, enamels and now acrylics and each of them has their own merits and of course each has a distinct down side.

Oils are very slow drying, enamels stink and everything needs to be cleaned and thinned with spirits and Acrylics dry very fast in fact sometime too fast.

Now I have finally clocked onto a device many painters have used for ages and for the life of me I don't know why I have not done this before. Maybe I am just slow on the uptake, possibly its because I have never really considered using one and simply cast it in the fad, gimmick or just rip-off  pile. After all our hobby is riddled with these kind of items. You can pick these up from an art shop, but the costs are high for what is basically a box with replaceable inserts.

Yes I am currently trying out a wet palette, mainly because I wanted to experiment and really see if it gave any benefit to me. Due in no small part with the fact I use a lot of vallejo dropper bottles and while the paint is excellent, its too thick to use straight from the bottle and I have grown tired of ruining good brushes simply mixing the paints ready to use, only for them to dry out in next to no time ( Something to do with the wife and the record internal temperatures she insists on). So after a little surfing around I stumbled on several designs that I could experiment with.
I am currently testing wet palette version 1 which is simply wet kitchen towel with a greaseproof top layer. All appears to be going rather nicely so far and it certainly does keep the paint alive and well for a good few hours. Alas my tub has no lid so it does dry out daily, but its no problem to refill with water when required.

I will of course try a couple of other methods and let you all know how I get on.

Loki

33 comments:

  1. I haven't felt the need to use it with Foundry my main paints, but it for sure is useful with Vallejo paints which are my second most used brand and tend to dry very fast indeed.

    Christopher

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    1. Have to agree the foundry paints are watery enough straight out of the pot, but it is useful when they age a bit and get thicker.

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  2. I haven't tried the wet pallete approach yet so look forward to seeing your results

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    1. I am liking the trial so far and the results I am getting

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  3. Be interested to see how you go with it. I have taken to using W&N acrylic flow enhancer which I find helps the drying.

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    1. That's one of the reasons for me trying this method, I have lots of pots of additives and they all add up.

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  4. I've tried wet pallette but didn't get on well with it. Maybe it's that I keep my flat at about 18-20 C and thin my Vallejo paints but they don't seem to dry out that quickly.

    Gothic punk? Cool. I'm a big fan of punk, goth and psychobilly

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    1. For me its because I tend to work in batches and the paint always dries out before I get the job done

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  5. I've always wanted to try a wet palette, but to be totally honest I just can't be bothered! I lurv quick drying paint and dodgy brushes..........maybe one day??

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    1. Well Ray my friend so far its cost me £2.00 and the results are good so far

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    2. It sounds good but have never tried it wet?

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  6. I must admit I have found it a useful tool.

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    1. Thanks Scott, I find it has improved things a fair bit so far

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  7. Sweet. I keep meaning to try something similar myself as have the same problems. Will follow this with interest.

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    1. I am pleased with the home brew MKIII kit I am currently testing and am seeing good results

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  8. Not tired it yet but it seems to work for some painters.
    cheers

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  9. News to me. Looking forward to your results w it. Me, I find half the time my Vallejo paints come out of the dropper bottles too watery.

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    1. If your vallejos are too watery they are not shaken properly, could I suggest you drop a couple of ball bearings in the pot or cut up a few chun ks of an old figure and drop them in then give them a damn got shake and they will mix

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  10. I am using the poor mans version now, Australian summers dry out my paints before I can get them from the bottle to the mini, so an old blister clam shell style, the foam insert left in that protected your miniature, some water and a sheet of baking or grease proof paper. Lid pops on and off in no time and the paint stays wet sometimes it collects too much moisture, but you have it for days. That said I still paint without one too. Hope this catches on as the purchase price can be very steep for a real artists one, cheers Chris.

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    1. Im on a similar method it has cost me just under £2.00 on bits so far and is working very well.
      We only have one season in this country lately bloody wet!

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  11. It's definately a useful tool especially with Vallejo paints. Having the ability to close the lid is only really useful if you mix a certain shade and paint with it over a few days.

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    1. I find it handy for when I get interrupted as well pop the lid on and can walk away for a good while and the paint has not dried out so its saving me money

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  12. Not really felt the need as I never use the vallejo range or dropper bottles.
    I prefer foundry or similar pots.
    Although if I did use the dropper bottles, I recon I would probably use one.
    I cant imagine you as a gothic punk, lol.
    Mind you, when I look back at the pics of me on facebook that old friends have posted from the early punk days of the late 70's and early 80's.
    Jeeze!! Did i really look like that.
    Great memories tho and a great period of my youth.

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    1. As you know I use all types of paint and some dont need the palette but vallejo is better with.

      I know what you mean about old pictures, I swear they should be banned

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  13. You were a goth punk? I was a rocker and if we'd met, we'd probably have had a fight in a bar alley :)

    Anyway, I'm a huge fan of the wet palette. I made my own about 6 months after I began painting and don't use anything else. I can put a lid on it, come back the next day and my paint is still wet. It saves me money!

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    1. It certainly is a money saver and that is a big plus in my book.

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  14. Yay for goths!
    It's probably hard to find now, but those old video shop video cases that were black vacuum formed, rather than the clear plastic ones towards the end, work well as they are quite shallow, but seal tightly. Like these: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Black-Video-Cassette-cases-/321332463674?pt=UK_Home_Garden_CD_DVDStorage_SM&hash=item4ad0e8483a

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    1. Thanks for the link Paul I have gone a different route at the moment but will bear it in mind.

      Oh yes those heady days of my misspent youth.

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  15. Now I am curious about this and have given it some thought myself. Not normally a problem for me insomuch as I don't tend to get to paint for great lengths of time, but I do find the summer months (yes really!) a pit of a pain with drying paint. I shall be watching your progess closely.

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    1. Summer months do you migrate Sir to warmer climates!! You could refill your wet palette in Summer lately with fresh rain water :)
      I will of course keep you updated.

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  16. Interesting. I´m really curious about your work with the wet palette. Usually, I close my painting table during the summer months...

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  17. Hi Andrew,

    good idea to give it a try.
    Some time ago I used a wet palette myself but since my collection of Vallejo paints has grown large enough to use the colours without mixing I avoided to work of preparing a wet palette...

    Cheers
    Stefan

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