25 July 2013

Scratch Building Basic 28mm scale Round houses - Part 1

Welcome to all the New followers, and apologies for my lack of posts of late mainly due to the hot weather, working through the night because its been to hot in the day to work and general tardiness. I even managed to get this series of posts wrong yesterday and hit the wrong button publishing the wrong post at the wrong time so sorry if you came looking for this earlier.

Right then back to the topic in question, I have a good friend who I knew to be lacking in a lot of physical terrain pieces. This made him a prime victim candidate for a bit of a Loki experiment!

A typical feature of Britain right up to the Dark Ages is the round houses, these can take several forms but are normally circular with some form of thatched roof.  Walls either being of wattle and daub, or further North they are made of stone.

In this guide I will attempt to make some basic versions with lift of roofs to enhance your tables. So lets start making our round houses.
First up we are going to need a sharp pencil, a ruler and scalpel. Some form of tube with a diameter of between 3 and 4 inches. A visit to your local carpet shop can be useful, failing that the innards from a left over roll of parcel tape. Mark the exterior of the tube approximately 35mm high around the circumference. You need to be very careful and cut around the line next to make the rings, try not too flatten your tube.
The next thing we need is a chunk of dense styrene, the blue stuff works best, thickness is dependant on the style of roof you want (more on this later). Mark the inside and outside diameter of the tubing, then cut the styrene around the exterior circumference as carefully as possible.
The next job is to cut down very slowly around the interior perimeter about 3 to 4 mm and level around the exterior, thus creating a lip which should nestle on top of the tube you cut earlier.
At this stage it's a trial fit we will neaten up what we need to later, while shaping the roof.
Here's another using a thicker chunk of styrene. At this stage you should check your figures will stand inside, simply because your figure base may increase the height. You can do this by placing the figure in the tube and popping the roof on if the roof wont sit as before, then you need the next step.
Take your scalpel and cut inwards and under about 1cm from the exterior to create a thicker wall. then cut a smaller circle in the centre quarter across both circles and remove the sections.
This can all be tidied up with a gentle rub with some sandpaper.

That's it for this part. When we come back to this we will shape the roof and start detailing the buildings.

25 comments:

  1. A cracking start, looking forward to seeing how these develop although now feel the urge to bake a tray of cup cakes. ;)

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  2. Interesting??? This has given me a few ideas already!!

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  3. Good idea. Im thinking i could do this for Woodland Indian Wigwams

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    Replies
    1. I have already drawn some plans for wiki ups and a longhouse they will no doubt appear here in the near future!

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    2. I look forward to seeing them.

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  4. Intriguing - looking forward to seeing how they develop

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  5. Hola
    INTERESANTE si señor,estaré a tentó
    Y gracias por compartir
    un saludo

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  6. Tutorials are always great posts. You guys do things that would never occur to me.

    Now, where is my picture of Gerard Butler?:)

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    Replies
    1. Hmmmf! I see I will have to placate the anger within and submit to your will, it shall be done in a few days, after all Loki needs time to ensure you are fairly recompensed for my error!!!

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  7. Now these look familiar :) great work

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  8. What size tube would you recommend for 15mm?

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    Replies
    1. A diameter around 1 1/2 to 2 inches max would work.

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  9. Good start to the tutorial. I wonder why high density foam is so difficult to find in my local market. I saw the first 2' x 2' x 1" panels ever last week. Perhaps I should have bought some.

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    Replies
    1. It is not easy to get hold of at the best of times.

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  10. Great start! Looking forward to the next steps! This is usefull for other scales to!

    Greetings
    Peter

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  11. Since I lack imagination, I need tutorials like this. Thanks, Loki!

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  12. Coming along nicely mate. I'll be watching this with interest.

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  13. Great start there Loki and I am looking forward to see how this pans out

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  14. Hi Andrew,

    good work so far.
    I'm looking forward to the second part.

    Cheers
    Monty

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  15. Great idea. Waiting patiently for the next installment...

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